Vimeo Awards: Motion Graphics finalists

The infamous American civil war speech of Abraham Lincoln, the adventures of the world’s most famous fictitious Belgian reporter, the art of the title sequence and a dark vision of a possible future. All subjects covered by this year’s finalists in the motion graphics category of the Vimeo awards.

A HISTORY OF THE TITLE SEQUENCE BY JURJEN VERSTEEG

Designed as a possible title sequence for a fictitious documentary this graduation project from Jurjen Versteeg beautifully summarises the history of the title sequence in film, in just over 2-minutes. Referencing and paying tribute to legendary artists Saul Bass and Maurice Binder and a whole host of others, Dutch designer Versteeg has created a fitting testimonial to an often overlooked artform.

YEAR ZERO – OFFF BARCELONA 2011 MAIN TITLES BY POSTPANIC

Shot on location in Prague and created by director Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer Si Scott,Year Zero – OFFF Barcelona 2011 Main Titles feels more like the opening to a movie depicting a vision of a dystopian, totalitarian future than a festival title sequence. The work was described as “a labour of love by a passionate crew of people” by Amsterdam production studio PostPanic and the “complete creative freedom” given to director Rozema makes for a truly individual sequence, that would happily grace any cinema screen

GETTYSBURG ADDRESS BY ADAM GAULT

New York based designer and animator Adam Gault re-imagines the infamous American civil war speech of U.S. president Abraham Lincoln with stunning monochrome illustrations and transforming typography. The resulting short is a haunting and powerful piece that presents this historic event to a brand new audience through modern design and animation techniques.

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN BY JAMES CURRAN

Created as an unofficial title sequence for Steven Spielberg’s feature length film The Adventures of Tintin, James Curran’s animated opener perfectly captures the epic adventures of Hergé’s original books. Featuring a central globe that ingeniously transforms from characters’ faces to planets to various objects featured in the stories, Curran’s playful piece feels perfectly matched to the stories of the fictitious Belgian reporter.

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