Still-from-The-Moth-Collectives-Global-Canopy-Programme-Film-Forest-500

Continuing their quest to help save the planet one film at a time, the Moth Collective are back with another film (their third) for tropical-forest think-tank – the Global Canopy Programme. It’s another impressive piece of animation (we don’t expect anything less from the Moth team) with a strong subject and another film that truly shows the power of the medium when it comes to conveying a message. The Mothletes took 5-minutes from their busy schedule (they’ve also just finished work on this splendid website for the Climate Reality Project) to explain why this film is different from their other Global Canopy Programme shorts and explain the importance of the project.

Forest 500 is the third film we’ve made for the Global Canopy Programme, after Amazonia Security Agenda in 2014 and Planet Under Pressure earlier this year. Forest 500 is the world’s first ratings agency for rainforests. It tracks how key companies, investors and governments are performing in the race to remove deforestation from global supply chains.

The difference between this film and the other two is that this one has a wider target audience, calling people to take notice of their everyday life, and how the way they lead it and the products they use affect deforestation and, as a wider consequence, climate change. For this film we had a shorter running time to work with, which allowed us to play with a snappier edit, something we really enjoyed. We also took it as an opportunity to try techniques and programs we had not worked with before, giving ourselves a new challenge. Colour-wise, we wanted to use a palette that was dynamic and vibrant, but that still felt nostalgic and organic. We achieved the latter by using cardboard textures, as well as a ‘screenprint’ look, which helped to tie all the shots together, some of them being more vector and some of them being more hand-drawn.

Oswald Skillbard who worked on the sound design (and has also worked with DN-featured directors Joe Bichard and Nicholas Ménard), used wood only to create all the sound effects for the film, a limitation which allowed for creativity and which we thought was of course very fitting for the nature of the film.

We are working on several projects at the moment, some commercial, some connected to documentary feature film collaborations, and our studio film too for the LNWC.

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